World Open: Part III

Round 8

I was paired against IM Bercys, rated 2467 in this round. I approached this round as a must win. The last day is always the decisive one, and this day would decide even more, with two games to be played.

[Event “?”]
[Site “?”]
[Date “2011.07.04”]
[Round “?”]
[White “Bercys”]
[Black “Bluvshtein”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[ECO “A00”]
[PlyCount “119”]
[EventDate “2011.06.30”]
[SourceDate “2011.07.04”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 c5 4. d5 exd5 5. cxd5 d6 6. Nc3 g6 7. Nd2 Bg7 8. Nc4
O-O 9. Bf4 Ne8 10. Qd2 b6 11. a4 Ba6 12. Nb5 Bxb5 13. axb5 Nd7 14. e3 Ne5 15.
Bxe5 Bxe5 16. Be2 Bg7 17. O-O Nc7 18. Na3 Re8 19. Ra2 Re4 20. Bc4 h5 21. Qd3
Re5 22. Nb1 Ne8 23. Nd2 Nf6 24. Rfa1 Re7 25. h3 Qe8 26. Qb3 g5 27. Be2 g4 28.
hxg4 hxg4 29. g3 Qd7 30. Ra4 Qf5 31. Qd1 Qxd5 32. Nc4 Qxd1+ 33. Rxd1 d5 34.
Nxb6 Rd8 35. Nc4 Rdd7 36. Na5 c4 37. b3 c3 38. Rc1 Ne4 39. Nc6 Re8 40. Bxg4 Rb7
41. Be2 Nd6 42. Rg4 Kf8 43. Rxg7 Kxg7 44. Rxc3 Nxb5 45. Rc5 a6 46. Na5 Rb6 47.
Rxd5 Nc3 48. Rd2 Nxe2+ 49. Rxe2 Rb5 50. Ra2 Rc8 51. Ra4 Rc2 52. g4 Rcc5 53. b4
Rc2 54. Nb3 Rb2 55. Nd4 Rb6 56. Kg2 R2xb4 57. Ra5 Kg6 58. Kg3 f6 59. Kf4 Rd6
60. f3 1/2-1/2

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 c5 4. d5 exd5 5. cxd5 d6 6. Nc3 g6 7. Nd2 Bg7 8. Nc4 O-O 9. Bf4 Ne8 10. Qd2 b6 11. a4 Ba6 12. Nb5 Bxb5 13. axb5 Nd7!

The position is still a theoretical one. Black’s last move sacrifices the d6 pawn. White should not take the pawn as after 14.Nxd6 Nxd6 15. Bxd6 Re8 White will have serious trouble both developing his pieces and keeping the extra pawn, as even one of the above would be an achievement. 14. e3 Ne5 15. Bxe5 Bxe5 16. Be2 Bg7 17. O-O Nc7 18. Na3 Interestingly enough, this position has been played. 18… Re8?! 18…Qd7 is more accurate, as Black attempts to play 19…a5 20.bxa5 b5 and create some good play. As it turns out, the a7 pawn is much weaker than the b5 pawn. 19. Ra2 Re4 20. Bc4 h5 Preparing to launch a future attack on the White King. 21. Qd3 Re5? The rook is seriously misplaced on this square. 21…Qe8 would have been stronger. 22. Nb1! Due to Black’s last move, White manages to improve the position of the Knight and follow that up with more pressure on the a7 pawn. 22… Ne8 23. Nd2 Nf6 24. Rfa1 Re7 Black is still solid with only one weakness. 25. h3 Qe8 26. Qb3

Neither side has a clear plan and I thought that I would complicate the matter. 26… g5?! Interesting but relatively careless. This permanently weakens Black’s King. 27. Be2! Preparing to lift the rook over to the King-side through a4 in the near future. 27… g4 28. hxg4 hxg4 29. g3 Qd7 30. Ra4 Qf5 I was going for something like this. 31. Qd1 Qxd5 32. Nc4 White forces the exchange of Queens. 32…  Qxd1+ 33. Rxd1 d5 34. Nxb6 Rd8 35. Nc4 The only move, but an optically pleasing one. The Knight is now headed to a5-c6. 35… Rdd7 36. Na5 c4 37. b3 c3? 37…Ne4 would have been better, but I had trouble parting with the g4 pawn. 38. Rc1 Ne4 39. Nc6 Re8 40. Bxg4 Rb7 41. Be2 Nd6 White is up a pawn but converting it into a full point is not easy because of the weak b5 pawn and the strong c3 pawn. 42.Nxa7 is answered with 42…d4, where Black generates good play. White starts to play carelessly. 42. Rg4 Kf8 43. Rxg7? The whole idea is a faulty one as we will see in a few moves. 43… Kxg7 44. Rxc3

44… Nxb5 45. Rc5 My opponent went for this position, with the idea that once White captures the d5 pawn and places his Knight on d4 he will have a Knight and two pawns for the rook and will then play a risk free position. 45… a6! The move my opponent missed. White cannot regroup his forces fast enough. 45.Rxd5 Nc3 is good for Black. 46. Na5 Rb6 47. Rxd5 Nc3 48. Rd2 Nxe2+ 49. Rxe2 The position has changed significantly. It is only Black who can play for a win now, due to the awkwardness of the Knight on a5. 49… Rb5 50. Ra2 Rc8 Preparing to activate all my forces. 51. Ra4 Rc2 52. g4 Rcc5 52…Rb6, with the idea of Rf6 would have been a better winning try. 53. b4 Rc2 53…Rc3 would have tied up the White forces even further. 54. Nb3 Rb2 55. Nd4 Rb6 56. Kg2 R2xb4 57. Ra5 I had originally gone for this position. Upon getting here, it became clear that the White pieces are better placed, the Knight is a monster on d4 and the a-pawn is not going anywhere. The position is probably still equal since White has trouble making progress, but it is important to not do anything foolish. 57… Kg6 58. Kg3 f6 59. Kf4 Rd6 60. f3 1/2-1/2

We agreed to a logical draw. This game lasted over 5 hours and the next round would start in about 2 hours. A good fight, but I did not use my opportunities after coming out on top after the middle game.

Round 9

I was paired against IM Lapshun, rated 2442 for this round. I was out of contention for any of the top spots at this point.

[Event “?”]
[Site “?”]
[Date “2011.07.04”]
[Round “?”]
[White “Bluvshtein”]
[Black “Lapshun”]
[Result “0-1”]
[ECO “A00”]
[PlyCount “56”]
[EventDate “2011.06.30”]
[SourceDate “2011.07.04”]

1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 c5 4. e3 Nf6 5. Nf3 Nc6 6. a3 cxd4 7. exd4 Be7 8. c5
O-O 9. b4 Ne4 10. Qd3 e5 11. Nxe5 a5 12. Bb2 Bf5 13. Nxc6 bxc6 14. Nxe4 Bxe4
15. Qc3 axb4 16. axb4 Rxa1+ 17. Bxa1 Bh4 18. Rg1 Re8 19. g3 Qf6 20. Qe3 Kf8 21.
gxh4 Bf3 22. Rg3 Rxe3+ 23. fxe3 Qxh4 24. Kf2 Be4 25. h3 f5 26. Bg2 g5 27. Bxe4
f4 28. exf4 gxf4 0-1

1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 c5 4. e3 Nf6 5. Nf3 Nc6 6. a3 cxd4 7. exd4 Be7 8. c5 O-O 9. b4 Ne4 10. Qd3 e5!?

Black sacrifices a pawn in the hope of taking advantage of the White King still being in the center of the board. 11. Nxe5 a5 11…Bf5 is also very interesting. 12. Bb2? Necessary was 12.Nxc6 bxc6 13.Nxe4 dxe4 14.Qc3, after which White develops easily. The text does not show a sense of urgency and is too slow. 12… Bf5 13. Nxc6? 13.Nxe4 Bxe4 14.Qc3 would have been much stronger, even though White is still not in a great situation.  13… bxc6 Now White is just in trouble. 14. Nxe4 Bxe4 15. Qc3 15.This was the right time to be desperate and play 15.Qh3, followed by Bd3. 15… axb4 16. axb4 Rxa1+ 17. Bxa1 Bh4!

White’s pieces are tied up and completely dominated. 18. Rg1 Re8 19. g3 One of the last remaining tricks for White, forcing Black to find an accurate win.

19… Qf6! After this move, the game is simply over. 20.gxh4 Bg2+ 21.Be2 Bf3 is lost on the spot. The rest is easy for Black. 20. Qe3 Kf8 21.gxh4 Bf3 22. Rg3 Rxe3+ 23. fxe3 Qxh4 24. Kf2 Be4 25. h3 f5 26. Bg2 g5 27. Bxe4 f4 28. exf4 gxf4 0-1

This was a horrible game on my part. I felt like I wasn’t seeing anything during the game and calculations were as flawed as they have been in a while. One way of explaining this is my 5+ hour game in the morning as well as 5+ hour game the night before. Tough pill to swallow either way. This was a very bad day at the office.

Next to come is a World Open Summary. After that I will do a full report on the 2011 Canadian Open. I have also been receiving a lot of questions about my plan after the World Cup. More chess or no chess? The answer will come soon…

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One Response to World Open: Part III

  1. dougslyDoug says:

    You play Riazantsev in the World Cup first round.

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